Scoreboard simulator 2007 now online

Archive 07 Apr 2007
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Can�t wait until 12 May to see how your favourite song will do? Thanks to the folks at Eurovision Nation (escnation.com) you can once again simulate the results. This year you have even more options that allow you to influence the outcome.

As they did last year, the folks at Eurovision Nation have created an online voting simulator for this year’s Eurovision Song Contest. The simulator first selects the 10 qualifiers from the semi-final, putting them in the open slots in the draw for the final. Then it runs the scoreboard for the final. The simulator uses a Gaussian (normal) statistical calculation, to randomly assign the points each country awards. You can, however, influence the randomness, including:

Entry chance:
using a slider you can specify whether you think an entry has little, some or a big chance to do well. You can weight the chance of one, several, or all the songs. Otherwise the default setting is for all entries to have equal chance.

Neighbourly/diasporic voting: tick this box and the simulator will increase the likelihood of neighbours and countries with large ex-pat communities awarding points accordingly. You cannot specify which countries are involved. And it calculates these scores with respect to all the neighbourly/diasporic voting patterns the Eurovision Nation programmers have set up: it’s all or nothing.

You can also decide if you want the old fashioned giving of points 1-12 individually or last year’s simultaneous posting of scores 1-7 followed by 8, 10 and 12 individually. You get the scores in English or alternating in English and French. Once the scoreboard is running you can pause it, speed it up, or slow it down. At the end it says “congratulations” to whomever won, and offers to reveal the semi-final scoreboard. But whatever entry comes out the winner, don’t get too excited: every time you run it gets a different result!

Click here for Eurovision Nation's homepage, then click on the 2007 Scoreboard Simulator link.


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John Egan


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